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The Evolution of Online Learning: Four Stages and What's Next?

(This 2022 post was modified in July 2023.)

The pandemic has made everyone far more knowledgeable about online learning platforms than they were 24 months ago. We each know (and feel) the strengths and the limitations of more than a few platforms. 

We each have a long and growing list of features we want to see in the next evolution of online learning.  So, it seems a rather good time to step back and explore the evolution of online learning - to see how far we've come, and where we might be heading.

One of the best resources out there is a simple progression chart shared in this intriguing article by Tiago Forte.

The Future of Education is Community: The Rise of Cohort-Based Courses


The evolution of online learning: What's next?


We love big-picture reflections like this. While we are all aware of the current disconnect that still exists between the reality of our online learning platforms and the skills and knowledge we want to transfer to learners, we can all agree that the evolution above represents some significant advances in a relatively short period of time. 

These advances have benefitted instructors and learners - and opened up learning opportunities for new users that otherwise would have been left out entirely. We couldn't agree more and are excited to see where the collective 'next steps' will be taken.

At Huddle Up, we humbly suggest that we are playing a part in moving this progression into the next phase: Interactive cohorts, focused on better solutions fueled by group feedback.




One thing is certain. Change is really the only constant. It's an exciting time in the world of online learning. While it's safe to say that no one can predict the future, the major themes are becoming clear.
  • Relevant, product-focused experiences are needed instead of recall, quizzes, and compliance.
  • Interactive, social learning is far more engaging than isolating experiences.
  • Contextual learning is replacing right/wrong.
  • We learn from feedback as we give and receive it.
  • Dynamic learning communities connect people.
  • Asynchronous experiences give learners flexibility.

Here's how we're trying to take the next step, and we're thrilled by what our users are saying about how we're innovating their experiences. 

Reach out and learn more at www.huddleuplearning.com to set up your free demo to experience for your team.

 
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